WORLD PREMIERE

ART BY NATURE

GOGOTTES

SPECIAL EXHIBITION 2021

The Dinosaur Museum Altmühltal presents in a worldwide unique special exhibition the enigmatic Gogottes, a 30 million years old rarity among minerals. From July 25 to November 07, 2021, visitors will experience a selection of the best of these extremely rare sandstone formations sculpted by nature in the museum’s exhibition hall. It is the first curated Gogottes exhibition in the world devoted exclusively to the fascinating lime-white creations.

The 26 Gogottes in the exhibition are outstanding specimens of their genus, not only because of their size (up to 250 cm) and weight (up to 1000 kilograms), but above all because of their particularly bizarre forms, which stimulate the human imagination. Because every viewer can discover something of his or her own in the softly curved, rounded, twisted structures: a snail shell, a gigantic ball of wool, a sleeping Buddha, an armadillo, cream or cloud formations – fascination for all viewers.

Gogottes originate from the dune sands of the area around the French town of Fontainebleau, about 70 kilometers southeast of Paris. Geologically, the whimsical, soft shapes are so-called concretions. These are accumulations of minerals that solidify deposited sedimentary rock. Exactly how the mysterious Gogottes came into being is not fully understood. Presumably, quartz crystallized from the region’s groundwater and solidified the sand of earlier dunes into whimsical shapes.

Gogottes originate from the dune sands of the area around the French town of Fontainebleau, about 70 kilometers southeast of Paris. Geologically, the whimsical, soft shapes are so-called concretions. These are accumulations of minerals that solidify deposited sedimentary rock. Exactly how the mysterious Gogottes came into being is not fully understood. Presumably, quartz crystallized from the region’s groundwater and solidified the sand of earlier dunes into whimsical shapes.

In the 17th century, construction workers had accidentally discovered the extremely rare quartz sand veins near Fontainebleau. France’s King Louis XIV loved the mysterious minerals and had his park at Versailles decorated with them. Later, the forms inspired Surrealist artists such as Jean Arp and sculptor Henry Moore. Today, exceptionally high sums are paid for the Gogotte beauties.

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